Sechelt Hospital, Expansion and Renovation (formerly St. Mary's Hospital)

Vancouver Coastal Health

Sechelt, British Columbia, Canada

Project Info
Sechelt Hospital, Expansion and Renovation (formerly St. Mary's Hospital)
Sechelt, British Columbia, Canada
Completion Date: 2013
Square Footage: 58,125
LEED NC Gold Certified

Awards:
Sustainable Design Award, 2014
International Academy for Design & Health

Use of Art in the Patient Environment Award, 2014
International Academy for Design & Health

Vancouver Coastal Health retained Perkins+Will, in association with Farrow Partnership Architects Inc., to design a 58,125 square foot (5,400 square meter) addition to the existing Sechelt Hospital to accommodate their expanded emergency, diagnostic imaging, ambulatory care, and special care services. The addition also provides increased inpatient accommodation, including two new floors of inpatient bedrooms with all single-occupancy, same-handed rooms. The intent was to then renovate the vacated space to increase on-site outpatient capacity. The addition’s parallel, separate circulation area that enhances privacy and isolates sensitive movements is one of several unique planning features that emerged from a Lean planning process.

Together, the art and architecture provide Sechelt with a new public face that radiates a message of welcome drawn from the area’s native culture. The shape of the building itself was inspired by the cedar bent-box, unique to the coastal First Nations. In this concept, the bent-box holds our most precious possession—our health. First Nations people believe a connection to nature is necessary for healing and overall health in all living things; hence, the new patient rooms offer oversize windows for optimum daylight and views and to free departing spirits.

As the project took shape, the team committed to achieving a “net-zero carbon footprint” project—that is, no campus energy usage increase compared with the current facility following completion of the project—a goal enabled through climate-responsive siting, envelope design, and energy-efficient lighting, coupled with an innovative ground-source heat pump energy system that serves both the existing campus and the addition. A comparison based on CO2 emissions concluded that the expanded campus carbon footprint is actually less than the current carbon emissions, and approximately 50% less than it would have been had the addition been completed by expanding the existing systems.

Type